Date Archives: May 2020

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buying a home | 94 Posts
mortgage | 3 Posts
real estate news | 44 Posts
selling a home | 28 Posts
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May
21

One of the biggest questions we all seem to be asking these days is: When are we going to start to see an economic recovery? As the country begins to slowly reopen, moving forward in strategic phases, business activity will help bring our nation back to life. Many economists indicate a recovery should begin to happen in the second half of this year. Here's a look at what some of the experts have to say.

Jerome Powell, Federal Reserve Chairman

"I think there's a good chance that there'll be positive growth in the third quarter. And I think it's a reasonable expectation that there'll be growth in the second half of the year… So, in the long run, I would say the U.S. economy will recover. We'll get back to the place we were in February; we'll get to an even better place than that. I'm highly confident of that. And it won't take that long to get there."

Nonpartisan Analysis for the U.S Congress

"The economy is expected to begin recovering during the second half of 2020 as concerns about the pandemic diminish and as state and local governments ease stay-at-home orders, bans on public gatherings, and other measures. The labor market is projected to materially improve after the third quarter; hiring will rebound and job losses will drop significantly as the degree of social distancing diminishes."

Neel Kashkari, President, Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank

"I think we need to prepare for a more gradual recovery while we hope for that quicker rebound."

We're certainly not out of the woods yet, but clearly many experts anticipate we'll see a recovery starting this year. It may be a bumpy ride for the next few months, but most agree that a turnaround will begin sooner rather than later.

During the planned shutdown, as the economic slowdown pressed pause on the nation, many potential buyers and sellers put their real estate plans on hold. That time coincided with the traditionally busy spring real estate season. As we look ahead at this economic recovery and we begin to emerge back into our communities over the coming weeks and months, perhaps it's time to think about putting your real estate plans back into play.

The experts note a turnaround is on the horizon, starting as early as later this year. If you paused your 2020 real estate plans, reach out to a local real estate professional at Montague Miller & Co today to determine how you can re-engage in the process as the country reopens and the economy begins a much-anticipated rebound.

Previously Published by Keeping Current Matters

May
11

 

Two Big Myths in the Homebuying Process | MyKCM

The 2020 Millennial Home Buyer Report shows how this generation is not really any different from previous ones when it comes to homeownership goals:

"The majority of millennials not only want to own a home, but 84% of millennials in 2019 considered it a major part of the American Dream."

Unfortunately, the myths surrounding the barriers to homeownership – especially those related to down payments and FICO® scores – might be keeping many buyers out of the arena. The piece also reveals:

"Millennials have to navigate a lot of obstacles to be able to own a home. According to our 2020 survey, saving for a down payment is the biggest barrier for 50% of millennials."

Millennial or not, unpacking two of the biggest myths that may be standing in the way of homeownership among all generations is a great place to start the debunking process.

Myth #1: "I Need a 20% Down Payment"

Many buyers often overestimate what they need to qualify for a home loan. According to the same article:

"A down payment of 20% for a home of that price [$210,000] would be about $42,000; only about 30% of the millennials in our survey have enough in savings to cover that, not to mention the additional closing costs."

While many potential buyers still think they need to put at least 20% down for the home of their dreams, they often don't realize how many assistance programs are available with as little as 3% down. With a bit of research, many renters may be able to enter the housing market sooner than they ever imagined.

Myth #2: "I Need a 780 FICO® Score or Higher"

In addition to down payments, buyers are also often confused about the FICO® score it takes to qualify for a mortgage, believing they need a credit score of 780 or higher.

Ellie Mae's latest Origination Insight Report, which focuses on recently closed (approved) loans, shows the truth is, over 50% of approved loans were granted with a FICO® score below 750. See graph below:

Two Big Myths in the Homebuying Process | MyKCM

Even today, many of the myths of the homebuying process are unfortunately keeping plenty of motivated buyers on the sidelines. In reality, it really doesn't have to be that way.

If you're thinking of buying a home, you may have more options than you think. Connect with a Montague Miller & Co REALTOR® to answer your questions and help you determine your next steps.

May
11

 

Will Home Values Appreciate or Depreciate in 2020? | MyKCM

With the housing market staggered to some degree by the health crisis the country is currently facing, some potential purchasers are questioning whether home values will be impacted. The price of any item is determined by supply as well as the market's demand for that item.

Each month the National Association of Realtors (NAR) surveys "over 50,000 real estate practitioners about their expectations for home sales, prices and market conditions" for the REALTORS Confidence Index.

Their latest edition sheds some light on the relationship between seller traffic (supply) and buyer traffic (demand) during this pandemic.

Buyer Demand

The map below was created after asking the question: "How would you rate buyer traffic in your area?"

Will Home Values Appreciate or Depreciate in 2020? | MyKCM

The darker the blue, the stronger the demand for homes is in that area. The survey shows that in 34 of the 50 U.S. states, buyer demand is now 'strong' and 16 of the 50 states have a 'stable' demand.

Seller Supply

The index also asks: "How would you rate seller traffic in your area?"

Will Home Values Appreciate or Depreciate in 2020? | MyKCM

As the map above indicates, 46 states and Washington, D.C. reported 'weak' seller traffic, 3 states reported 'stable' seller traffic, and 1 state reported 'strong' seller traffic. This means there are far fewer homes on the market than what is needed to satisfy the needs of buyers looking for homes right now.

With demand still stronger than supply, home values should not depreciate.

What are the experts saying?

Here are the thoughts of three industry experts on the subject:

        Ivy Zelman:

"We note that inventory as a percent of households sits at the lowest level ever, something we believe will limit the overall degree of home price pressure through the year."

Mark Fleming, Chief Economist, First American:

"Housing supply remains at historically low levels, so house price growth is likely to slow, but it's not likely to go negative."

       Freddie Mac:

"Two forces prevent a collapse in house prices. First, as we indicated in our earlier research report, U.S. housing markets face a large supply deficit. Second, population growth and pent up household formations provide a tailwind to housing demand."

Looking at these maps and listening to the experts, it seems that prices will remain stable throughout 2020. If you're thinking about listing your home, let's connect to discuss how you can capitalize on the somewhat surprising demand in the market now. Get in touch with a Montague Miller & Co REALTOR® today!

May
11

 

Why Home Equity is a Bright Spark in the Housing Market | MyKCM

Given how we have seen more unemployment claims than ever before over the past several weeks, fear is spreading widely. Some good news, however, shows that more than 4 million initial unemployment filers have likely already found a new job, especially as industries such as health care, food and grocery stores, retail, delivery, and more increase their employment opportunities. Breaking down what unemployment means for homeownership, and understanding the significant equity Americans hold today, are important parts of seeing the picture clearly when sorting through this uncertainty.

One of the biggest questions right now is whether this historic unemployment rate will initiate a new surge of foreclosures in the market. It's a very real fear. Despite the staggering number of claims, there are actually many reasons why we won't see a significant number of foreclosures like we did during the housing crash twelve years ago. The amount of equity homeowners have today is a leading differentiator in the current market.

Today, according to John Burns Consulting, 58.7% of homes in the U.S. have at least 60% equity. That number is drastically different  than it was in 2008 when the housing bubble burst. The last recession was painful, and when prices dipped, many found themselves owing more on their mortgage than what their homes were worth. Homeowners simply walked away at that point. Now, 42.1% of all homes in this country are mortgage-free, meaning they're owned free and clear. Those homes are not at risk for foreclosure (see graph below):

Why Home Equity is a Bright Spark in the Housing Market | MyKCM

In addition, CoreLogic notes the average equity mortgaged homes have today is $177,000. That's a significant amount that homeowners won't be stepping away from, even in today's economy (see chart below):

Why Home Equity is a Bright Spark in the Housing Market | MyKCM

 

In essence, the amount of equity homeowners have today positions them to be in a much better place than they were in 2008.

The fear and uncertainty we feel right now are very real, and this is not going to be easy. We can, however, see strength in our current market through homeowner equity that has not been there in the past. That may be a bright spark to help us make it through.